Search

I continue to keep a very close eye on Hurricane Isaias as it will be moving along the East Coast of Florida on Sunday before heading northward and riding up the U.S. East Coast on Monday into Tuesday. I still think that Isaias will track over some part of Southern New England during Tuesday and Tuesday night. My thinking is for the center of Isaias to track across eastern Connecticut before moving across eastern Mass late Tuesday night. What does this mean for our weather? For Western & Central Mass, it means that rain is expected to overspread the region during Tuesday morning and become heavy at times during Tuesday afternoon and Tuesday night. Rain is expected to end late Tuesday night or Wednesday morning. At this time, I think that a couple of inches of rain looks likely across Western and Central Mass. As for wind, I think that since we will be on the western side of the storm, wind will not be too much of a problem. With that said, wind gusts of 25-35 mph are possible out of the north and northeast Tuesday afternoon and Tuesday night, especially in the Worcester Hills. For Coastal Southern New England, Rain and wind will gradually increase during the day on Tuesday and become a heavy wind-swept rain during Tuesday night. It currently appears that the center of Isaias will track right across southeastern Connecticut, central and northern Rhode Island and eastern Mass late Tuesday night. If this occurs, then wind gusts of up to 60 mph are possible across much of Rhode Island, eastern and southeastern Mass and the Cape. 1 to 3 inches of total rainfall is also forecast across eastern Mass and the Cape. Needless to say, I am watching Isaias extremely closely and will have additional updates for you over the next couple of days. Thank you for reading my latest forecast for Western and Central Mass. I do not charge for this information, but I am asking for donations to offset operating costs. All donations go to directly offsetting my costs of running Route 20 Weather which include (but not limited to) website hosting & bandwidth, subscriptions to weather data services, as well as electricity and broadband internet. Any amount that you can donate is truly appreciated! Donations can be made by PayPal using E-Mail address contact@route20weather.com or by going to https://www.route20weather.com/donate . If you would rather donate by check or money order, please e-mail me at contact@route20weather.com & I can send you my mailing address. Thank you again for your support of Route 20 Weather!

I am keeping a very close eye on Tropical Storm Isaias, which is now approaching the Bahamas. Current forecast trends are for Isaias to not only strengthen into a hurricane over the next couple of days, but to also track northward along the East Coast of the United States this weekend into early next week. This means that Isaias may track very near, if not right over some part of Southern New England on Monday night and Tuesday. What does this mean for our weather? For Western & Central Mass, it means that a wind-swept heavy rain may overspread Western and especially Central Mass on Monday night and continue into Tuesday. How much rain falls will depend highly on the exact track of Isaias. Also, the strength of the wind will also heavily depend on the exact track of the storm. For Coastal Southern New England, A heavy wind-swept rain is expected beginning Monday night and continue into Tuesday. Based on the current trends in the weather forecast model guidance, it appears that the center of Isaias may track right across the Cape. If this occurs, then winds of up to 55 to 75 mph would be possible across the Cape with 35 to 55 mph winds possible along the South Coast of New England, as well as across coastal Eastern Mass. Needless to say, I am watching Isaias extremely closely and will have updates for you in the coming days. Thank you for reading my latest forecast for Western and Central Mass. I do not charge for this information, but I am asking for donations to offset operating costs. All donations go to directly offsetting my costs of running Route 20 Weather which include (but not limited to) website hosting & bandwidth, subscriptions to weather data services, as well as electricity and broadband internet. Any amount that you can donate is truly appreciated! Donations can be made by PayPal using E-Mail address contact@route20weather.com or by going to https://www.route20weather.com/donate . If you would rather donate by check or money order, please e-mail me at contact@route20weather.com & I can send you my mailing address. Thank you again for your support of Route 20 Weather!

I continue to keep a very close eye on an area of low pressure that is now located near the outer banks of North Carolina. This storm system is very likely to become Tropical Storm Fay either later today or tonight. It is expected that this storm system will pass near the coasts of Maryland, Delaware and New Jersey on Friday before tracking across Southern New England as a 45 to 60 mph tropical storm on Friday night and Saturday morning. What does this mean for our weather? For Western & Central Mass, it means rain will overspread the area during Friday afternoon with rain, heavy at times, expected throughout Friday night and Saturday morning. The rain will come to an end by midday Saturday with gradual clearing expected during Saturday afternoon. 1 to 3 inches of total rainfall is expected depending on the exact track of this storm. This means that some urban and street flooding is possible. Flash flooding is possible should there be any prolonged heavy rain bands with this storm. In addition to the heavy rain, gusty east to southeast winds with wind gusts of up to 40 mph are expected late Friday afternoon and Friday night. For Coastal Southern New England, A heavy wind-swept rain is expected beginning Friday afternoon and continuing through Friday night and Saturday morning. Total rainfall amounts of 1 to 3 inches are expected. In addition, east to southeast wind gusts of up to 50 to 60 mph are possible Friday afternoon and Friday night. Coastal flooding doesn’t look likely, but extremely rough surf and rip currents are likely Saturday through Sunday at all Southern New England beaches. So, if you’re headed to the beach this weekend, use extreme caution & if you should be caught in a rip current, remember to swim parallel to the shore. Gradual clearing is expected across coastal Southern New England during Saturday afternoon. Needless to say, I am watching this storm system closely and will have more updates as needed. Thank you for reading my latest forecast for Western and Central Mass. I do not charge for this information, but I am asking for donations to offset operating costs. All donations go to directly offsetting my costs of running Route 20 Weather which include (but not limited to) website hosting & bandwidth, subscriptions to weather data services, as well as electricity and broadband internet. Any amount that you can donate is truly appreciated! Donations can be made by PayPal using E-Mail address contact@route20weather.com or by going to https://www.route20weather.com/donate . If you would rather donate by check or money order, please e-mail me at contact@route20weather.com & I can send you my mailing address. Thank you again for your support of Route 20 Weather!

 

©2020 by Route 20 Weather, A Subsidiary Of Crown Weather Services. Proudly created with Wix.com